LEE YANG YANG

lee yang yang

an architect
COMPETITION

SINE

runner-up submission entry for installation
in collaboration with Jacqueline Armstrong & Nicholas Putrasia
2013, PERTH CONCERT HALL

How do we perceive sound spatially? A three dimensional sinusoidal wave consisting of individual paper rolls suspended in space by helium balloons. The wave peaks in the center of the void, simultaneously appreciating the spiral staircase. The observers may interact with the installation by rolling up and down individual paper rolls, generating a moving visual rthym in space.

The installation puts forward that a sound element, the sound wave such as a set of rthym or even a musical note is a collection of smaller units making up a discernible composition. Like the suspending paper rolls, they are a series of oscillations making up a perceptible pattern. The visual perception of the wave also depends on the position of the observer in space, whether you are on the foyer, the staircase or the mezzanine, not dissimilar to our relativistic perception of sound. This illustrates the fact that the sound that one hears is slightly different than another individual depending on just where they stand in relation to the source of the sound.

We all understand that sound is produced by oscillations, which is usually graphically represented as waves. However, this is only two dimensional. Sound does not just travel in two dimensions, it travels in four,  including space and time.

Sound moves through space in a series of oscillations, warping and compressing itself around bodies in space not unlike a gravitational field. Here the spiral staircase in the void acts as a body that disrupts the travel of sound wave, being compressed and appreciated around the object, as compared to the sound wave that travels through an objectless space.

Sound henceforth is thus subtly modified, appreciated and heightened to us just by being there, as our bodies in space demands the warping of the sound wave around us.

AUSTRALIAN SKYLINE / LANDSCAPE

AUSTRALIAN SKYLINE LANDSCAPE

photomontage of proposal

2015, SUBMISSION FOR TAPESTRY DESIGN PRIZE FOR ARCHITECTS

Proposed for the 2015 Australian Pavilion at the 56th Venice Biennale, this piece of tapestry is a figurative collage of major Australian skylines and landscape. Like New York City’s diorama at the 1939 – 1940 World’s Fair, a large wall tapestry envelops a grandroom, extending observer’s perception to that of the image. Unlike a picture window, the image do not have to simulate a reality that we know, but rather offers a visual interpretation.

Similar to an actual woven tapestry, the collage is a carefully joining of patchworks that defines a whole. As a nation cannot be adequately defined by the skyline of a city, this piece collages skylines of the major Australian cities; namely Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, Adelaide, Gold Coast as well as Hobart, Darwin and Cairns. The word ‘skyline’ is a rather oxymoron when compared to the predominantly flat landscape of Australia. The image here then reflects the central flat plains of Australia, with the foreground dominated by major Australian coastal cities. Canberra, the Australian capital, designed by Walter Burley Griffin and planned between the two largest cities of Sydney and Melbourne is an etching into the inland Australian landscape. While a typical image of a city’s skyline focuses on a tall well-known skyscraper, this collage fixates itself into the natural rock formation of Uluru / Ayer’s Rock – an affirmation that natural landscape defines Australia as much as the skyline of cities.

PLATES AND PLATEAU

video walkthrough of proposal

2014, SUBMISSION FOR CANTERBURY EARTHQUAKE MEMORIAL COMPETITION

The quake unforeseen.
A reminder, mother nature’s fury.
The earth is to be respected, the ground sacred.
Following the groundline –
The plates, the plateaus emerge from the terrain.
Amongst low wall seats, the serene lawn.
Ramps carving slightly into the earth.
Steps terracing the ground.
Descending slowly into the river.
Water ebbs and flows against the plates.
Touching the water, a reflection. A contemplation.
The plateau, memorial ground. Local stone, Waitaha pavers.
Gold etched into the stone, 185 names.
To the earth, we remember.

CORRUGAMI

proposal for pop-up bookshop design in corrugated steel

SUBMISSION FOR ARCHITEXT POP-UP BOOKSHOP DESIGN AT THE NATIONAL ARCHITECTURE CONFERENCE
2014, PERTH CONFERENCE CENTER

A single sheet of paper if folded correctly can support a brick. This is the initial idea of the work, where corrugated metal sheet are folded upon itself to give itself structural integrity to support weight. A single sheet of corrugated metal is cut across the ribs, leaving the pans intact thus enables the folding of the continuous sheet. The metal sheet is then folded into a looped shape that stands on its own without any other structural support apart from some stiffeners. Sharp edges are either buffed, flashed or covered with proprietary tools or products.

 

MEJA TABLE

table; steel parallel flange channel and meranti solid wood

MEJA
SUBMISSION FOR RIVA 1920
2014

Marriage of wood and steel.
Meranti dan keluli.
Solidity and rigidity.

Expressing the structural aesthetic of the industrial steel parallel flange channel (PFC),
75 x 40mm welded support posts and beam.
Table top features 45mm meranti solid wood spanning 2.4 meters long.

OCULUS CORNER

proposal for an urban room

SUBMISSION FOR  1 x ∞ IDEAS COMPETITION
2013, HAYNIE’S CORNER, INDIANA, USA

Momentful urban space to anchor artworks for the art district in Haynie’s Corner. Bringing people up around the oculus to an elevated balcony for activation.

CITY OF MIST

conceptual submission

Top 7 entry
PINarchitecture Competition
2013, PERTH

‘”The low anchored cloud would be a brilliant relief from the heat for a city’s residents and ecosystems alike. Additionally, one can imagine the comfort and allure of the mist as a catalyst in activating public space at-will.”

Submission for the brief of The Sweating City; global temperatures are rising, on average, and will continue to rise for the foreseeable future.  Air conditioning and shading devices may not be enough to sustain the livability of cities, where the majority of the world’s population now lives.  Sweating is an automatic mechanism to regulate body temperature. Similarly, how might a city regulate its temperature through an automatic water distribution system?  Where will water come from, with increasing need and diminishing sources?  How might the volume of water needed during heat events be delivered through a network, or series, of devices?  How might a city sweat?

 

ROACHATTAN

ROACHATTAN

a sandcastle

Delirious City Beach: A Sarcastical Manifesto for Roachattan
in collaboration with Andrei Smolik, Amy Quach, Jessie Nguyen & Lee Ren Jian
MERGE SANDCASTLE  BUILDING COMPETITION

The sandcastle competition brief calls for the imagining of sandcastles as habitat for cockroaches. Peter Eisenman’s Monument to the Murdered Jews of Europe, New York Manhattan’s city grid and Le Corbusier’s Ville Contemporaine for Paris all serves as backdrop to the urban manifesto to the insect species, that is doomed to fail, thanks to the chaotic and erratic nature of the cockroach in contrast to the imposed order and strict cleanliness of the city. It will however serve as a failed example of the parallel modernist experiment for the fellow cockroaches.